• Elizabeth the 333rd,  Oops

    Food of the Trees

    As I’ve said, I loved, or to be more precise, love, trees. I like to be alone with my thoughts, and trees provide that separation, that sanctuary from the rest of the world. I rarely spoke as I got older and think that came from learning very early on, it was easy to incriminate myself, even if I’d done nothing wrong. Silence was my defense before there was a crime. My favourite trees are fruit, but not on the apple Isle (Tasmania), there’s no fruit trees out where I live, so it’s a plus that really any tree will do. During my early teens I sat in an old Loquat…

  • Elizabeth the 333rd,  Oops

    Magpies and Me

    Living in Western Australia, it’s a common occurrence to be swooped by Magpies. Walking to the shops was a test of endurance, sporting events were mazes run by the rules of each magpie around the course, throughout each event. I experienced two notable events at the beak and feet of Magpies, one was when I was eleven, the other was when I was twenty-eight. This memory is short. It’s about the attack when I was eleven. I was a real Tom Boy, probably still would be if I was capable, so I did things like jumping off haystacks and house roofs. My favorite activity though, was climbing trees. I sat…

  • Elizabeth the 333rd,  Oops

    Cats

    As you can tell from my stories, cats were an inevitability for me. I love animals in general. Whether they be Cats; birds; dogs, even reptiles and bovines. Animals don’t actively seek out human beings to harm them, they at least hide, only attacking when no other option is available. My family eventually built a house, and we moved in when I was still in grade five. Off to one side of the house, the builders had left a pile of rubble. As a kid, I knew it as the ‘Pile’. In the Pile a stray cat would, for years, nest, and give birth several times a year. I wasn’t…

  • Elizabeth the 333rd,  Oops

    The Terrifying Tale of Toothems

    I’m likely eight at this point and I don’t recall ever receiving a doll for a present… ever! Maybe I did before I can remember, but I doubt it. So, Christmas comes around. Everyone’s so hyped getting ready for the fat man in the red suit to break into the house, through the chimney, if you can believe that! We even left food out to feed the B&E offender… Anyway, I digress. Christmas morning comes around and I pretty much knew what I held in my hands before opening it. It was large, rectangular and thin, you got it, a book. It was a nice book of fairy stories, but…

  • Elizabeth the 333rd,  Oops

    A Couple of Death Defying Moments

    Things become a little blurred between grades 4 and 5. We shifted around quite a bit in the early years. My first recollection of that school, with Miss Handcock, is when we lived in a semi rural area. There was only white sand, with spattering’s of brush, around us. I’d arrive home from school, after walking through that sand and bush, with a wild kitten in my hands more often than not, only to be instructed to, ‘Take it back!’ My older sibling and I walked, what I think I can rightly say, at least 5-km’s to school, then, back again. With no street lights, or floods lights, the walk…

  • Elizabeth the 333rd,  Oops

    Miss Handcock

    Grade three we were living back in Perth. I was at a new school and a couple of incidentals occurred there, like I had my finger in my sleeper earring, newly pierced, and a friend pulled my arm down and I tore the flesh and the earring out. I broke my arm in year four and was in a cast for a few months, I had a new teacher for the last part of the year and she constantly berated me for my messy work for the first part of the year. Saying, “I had a broken arm and had write with my left hand,” meant nothing to her. I…

  • Elizabeth the 333rd,  Oops

    Corporal Punishment

    Change of scene. Dad worked on the mines, as I’ve previously said, and we all moved to Kambalda for a year, at least I think it was a year. I have memories of sitting in a white painted, wooden tower, with many miners wives, peeling, and shelling, vegetables for the miners dinners. Today those places are called Donga’s and I don’t think the women and children are permitted to live in them. Now, miners are flown in and out. My clearest memory is the school. It was a time when corporal punishment was still a viable, and frequently used, option to discipline children. My walk from the miners camp to…

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